3 Reasons Why You Need Work Boundaries

Boundaries are an important part of every role you fill. Knowing your limits and having the confidence to stick to your boundaries are keys to avoiding burnout. But often, for those who have found a way to make a living at their hobbies, the lines between work and leisure become blurred. The lines are even further smudged when the nature of our work is serving or helping others. Here are three reasons why work is not a hobby, and why you need to sit down and define your work boundaries today.

Your time is limited. Your work can be an extension of your favorite hobby; it’s true. But if you are going to avoid workaholism, you must learn the habit of separating work time from rest time. Work time is the portion of your day, week, or month that you devote to making a living. Rest time is the portion that you devote to your other core values—including things like family time, time with friends, and time off (aka taking a vacation.) Every person only has a certain number of days to live, and that includes you. Being intentional about how you want to spend the time you are given is the first key to finding balance between work and hobbies.

Your bandwidth is limited. You are not a robot. Mentally and physically, you need down time to recharge. Work is the daily grind. Hobbies are things that take us away from the daily grind. In fact, when we take a step away from the usual, rote, monotonous work tasks, we force our brains to shift into a different gear. When we begin to take joy in experiencing life through our hobbies, we are actually nourishing our brains!

Sadly, our culture has become so engrossed with work, that humans can even feel guilty about taking time off. What’s interesting is that working non-stop does not open doors to innovation— it locks them. However, when we take a step outside the 9-5 routines, we often find that we are able to more clearly see the solutions to professional hurdles. Prioritizing time to step away from work to put things in perspective is the second key in finding balance between hobbies and work.

Your abilities are limited. Let’s face it, very few successful organizations are a one-woman show. And if she does find success, it is short lived. Teams help lighten the load. Accepting help from co-workers does not mean that you are incompetent. It means that you are wise enough to see that many hands make light work, and that you believe there is more to life than working. Set reasonable expectations for what you can accomplish during work hours and work to the best of your ability. Then, practice the self-control to walk away from anything that goes beyond that, and start again tomorrow. Putting first things first is the third way you can move toward balance personally and professionally.

Recognize the Warning Signs of a Stroke

A stroke occurs when your brain is not receiving the blood that it needs. When a person is having a stroke, s/he may or may not be aware that something is off. If the person experiencing a stroke receives proper medical care fast enough, then their chances increase for recuperating from or surviving this event. For this reason, it is important that everyone knows how to recognize the warning signs of a stroke so that they can act F.A.S.T.

F – is for FACE. Ask the person to smile, and see if their face is symmetrical or if one side droops.

A – is for ARMS. Ask the person to raise their arms. Is one arm weak? Are they unable to lift it, or does it sag?

S – is for SPEECH. Ask the person to say a simple phrase like “My name is Mike.” Is their speech slurred, slow, strange, or altered in any way that is unusual for them?

T– is for TIME. If you suspect that you or someone around you is having a stroke, don’t wait. Call 9-1-1 immediately so that medical professionals can get the person to a hospital right away.

For further reading, check out this article.
If you think that you or someone around you is experiencing an emergency, dial 9-1-1.
The opinions stated in this blog post are not a substitute for professional medical advice. Always consult with your physicians before incorporating new foods into your diet or making any lifestyle changes.

Beets 3 Ways

Beets are a nutritional powerhouse. They are mostly water, which means that they can help you feel full without being loaded with calories—there are only around 60 calories in an entire cup of raw beet roots. Beets contain antioxidants, fiber, iron, and potassium, as well as vitamins B and C. They could help to improve your blood flow (leaving you feeling more energized) and they could even help lower your blood pressure. Their leaves, stems, and roots are all edible. The leaves are gentler and less bitter than kale, which makes them more palatable for many people. The stalks can be fibrous. If you’re gardening, go ahead and trim greens early, or look for smaller stalks if you’re shopping at the market. Here are three delicious ways to enjoy beets.


Raw Try grating beet root right on top of your salad. Another favorite is juicing beet root with red and purple fruits including cherries, berries, and grapes. Short on time? Bottled beet juice is also readily available in most health food stores.


Sautéed Beet leaves are a great substitution for recipes that call for kale, spinach, collard or turnip greens. Try steaming the stalks and leaves for around 8 minutes. When they’re tender, throw them in a sauté pan with a little balsamic vinegar. When the vinegar has reduced, transfer the vegetables to a serving dish. Sprinkle with raisins and walnuts.


Roasted Roasted, chopped beet root is a great addition to almost any sheet pan recipe that calls for sweet potatoes, carrots, or gold potatoes. Roasted beets taste earthy and slightly sweet without being starchy, and their purple color brings visual interest to any plate.


The opinions stated in this blog post are not a substitute for professional medical advice. Always consult with your physicians before incorporating new foods into your diet.

How to Bring Mindful Awareness on Your Walk

Autumn weather is usually pleasant and mild— making it a great time to practice yoga outdoors. After your asana, taking a walk is one way that you can welcome mindful awareness. It’s no secret that when our thoughts are racing, we can feel stressed. Walking outdoors can help you restore balance between your mind and body. The rhythm of walking can help you clear your mind, order your thoughts, and bring awareness to the present. It can even aid in unlocking creativity or helping you see how to overcome obstacles.

In addition to helping balance the connection between your mind, body, and spirit (in Sanskrit: the purusha and prakriti) here are 10 physical benefits of walking.

  1. It could help improve your mood, help you feel relaxed, or lower your blood pressure.
  2. You may experience better sleep.
  3. It could help your immunity.
  4. When you walk, the cadence between your right- and left-body can benefit your brain.
  5. You could feel less hungry, which may be beneficial if you are trying to lose weight.
  6. Walking has been proven to be good for your heart.
  7. It may help you maintain bone density.
  8. As you age, walking can help you keep a broader range of motion than if you are sedentary.
  9. It may help you avoid developing varicose veins.
  10. Walking and sharing thoughts with a friend (4-legged or 2-legged!) can also help us feel more connected to those we love!

Essential Oils for Your Body Type

New to essential oils? You may be wondering where to begin. I always tell people to think of Christmas: start with smells that bring you “comfort and joy!”

Smells are powerful. They can transform you– taking you to a memory from the past, helping you relax, and invigorating your senses. That’s because essential oils stimulate the limbic system (the part of your brain that controls emotions and memories.) Smells can affect your mood, helping you to feel energized or more relaxed. In Ayurveda, oils can be used to help balance our natural constitution (or doshas.)

Vata doshas: take a look at earthy, woodsy notes like cinnamon, patchouli, orange, geranium, myrrh, and sandalwood.
Pitta doshas: consider mints like peppermint, spearmint, and wintergreen. For floral notes, consider trying Ylang Ylang, gardenia, and jasmine.
Kapha doshas: introduce yourself to ginger, clove, juniper, angelica, or marjoram. When my kapha is low, I enjoy a blend of eucalyptus and tea tree.

Always consult with your health care providers before beginning any new healthcare regimen, including the use of essential oils. The above is a personal opinion and should not be a substitute for professional medical advice.

Autumn Ayurvedic Spices

Autumn is a Vatta season! It is cool, crisp, windy, and filled with prana—that’s why we recognize that we can smell the autumn air. Here is a list of spices that pair perfectly with this season’s bountiful fruits and vegetables.

Allspice, anise, cardamom, cinnamon, clove and nutmeg are great for baking. Their warmth and spice bring out the sweetness in baked goods, especially with pumpkin and apple. They can be sprinkled over root vegetables or blended into your coffee.

Saffron brings brightness to any dish. It easily lends flavor to rice, cous cous, or risotto. It pairs well with dill, and my favorite way to use saffron is to stir it into yogurt or crema. It is the perfect touch to Mediterranean recipes.

Turmeric is the earthiest spice. Since autumn is the best time ayurvedically to enjoy fatty proteins, turmeric’s rich, deep yellow color is a welcome addition to egg salad. It also lends color to soups and stews with vegetable stock as their base. My favorite way to incorporate turmeric is in a big bowl of vegetarian chili!

Consult with your physicians before beginning any new healthcare practices or changes to your diet.

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The Health Benefits of Pumpkin

Fall is here, and that means pumpkin has found its way into coffee creamers and baked goods. Let’s look at a few of the benefits.

Pumpkin, bitter melon, and other gourd seeds and fruits are loaded in vitamins and minerals. They are used across ayurveda to treat vatta imbalances. Among gourds, pumpkin is the most popular. It is earthy, grounding, and comforting. That’s likely because it contains tryptophan. This can make you feel relaxed and calm. After eating a bowl of pumpkin soup or a handful of pumpkin seeds, you may even notice that you sleep better. Cinnamon and nutmeg are warming spices that often accompany pumpkin. To balance its flavor profile in savory dishes, fat from coconut milk or acid from balsamic vinegar can change it up and make it more interesting.

Pumpkin is also pacifying for pitta doshas. Like other orange vegetables, pumpkin is rich in beta carotene which means it is rich in vitamins A and D. These vitamins have been shown to aid in eye health, asthma, heart disease, and certain types of cancers. Studies have also shown that it can be helpful in regulating blood sugar and blood pressure. Last, it can aid in weight loss. It is low in calories and filled with fiber, which can help you feel fuller longer.

If you are looking for ways to incorporate pumpkin into your diet, remember that fresh roasted pumpkin will have more vitamins and minerals (and fewer preservatives) than canned. The texture of fresh pumpkin is also fluffier– like a baked potato, whereas canned pumpkin can be off-putting. Consider substituting baked pumpkin in recipes that call for potatoes, sweet potatoes, or carrots. And if you’re already tired of pumpkin, consider substituting butternut squash, acorn squash, or sweet potatoes in your seasonal recipes–especially savory recipes!

Consult with your doctors before making any changes to your diet.

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The Health Benefits of Apples

In ayurveda, we eat seasonally. Nothing says autumn like pumpkins… or is it apples? Throughout the month of September, I am offering you ways to incorporate these two ayurvedic powerhouses into your menu. Let’s start with apples.

Apples contain Vitamin C, potassium, and antioxidants like quercetin, catechin, and chlorogenic acid that are good for your brain and immune health. Raw apples help clean your teeth, tongue, and gums. They are rich in fiber and can aid in regularity. They are relatively low in calories (around 50 calories for a small apple) and their natural sugars can give you energy.

The cooling qualities of red apples pacify Pitta doshas, and the tart qualities of granny Smith apples are cleansing for Kapha doshas. But apples don’t agree with everyone; they can aggravate Vata doshas. If you’re a Vata type who longs for apples, consider cooking them down and adding a little cinnamon.

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5 Ways to Get Back on Track

Sometimes we get derailed. Your plans go awry. You had an idea of how your day would go, but something unforeseen happened and now you’re feeling frazzled. If you’ve got 5 minutes, here are 5 habits that can help you get back on track.

Breathe Pranayama is the yogic practice of intentional breathing. Begin with 3 calming breaths.

Hydrate You already know that your body is mostly water and that it depends on water for pretty much every process. Dehydration can lead to headaches or even changes in blood pressure, which can make a bad day even worse.

Remember Obstacles have the potential to make us more resilient. Instead of working against hindrances, try leaning into them. Ask yourself how you can harness this setback to come out stronger on the other side.

Move Exercise equals endorphins, and endorphins can improve our mood. Whether it’s a few seated twists at your desk or choosing to take the stairs instead of the elevator, step it up. Walk it off.

Focus So your plans were derailed. It happens. Take a moment to think on a few things that could still work out for you today: a run, a fantastic dinner, a frivolous dessert, a relaxing bath, or all of the above!

Shake It Up

When it comes to shakes and smoothies, most people are fans. Even if you’ve had an experience with the grainy or artificially flavored ones, chances are you’re willing to try again with a different brand in hopes of having a better experience. But many brick-and-mortar smoothie shop shakes are almost completely composed of ice. This can leave you feeling hungry. Some are not made from the highest quality ingredients, and others are outrageously expensive. Fortunately, there are some great shake options out there that you can make in your own kitchen or at work (which might actually be one and the same these days!)

Performance shakes are developed for those who are looking to take their work-out routines to the next level. They usually come in two varieties: pre-workout fuel or post-workout recovery. In the world of yoga, these shakes might promise energy for your asana. For energy, consider looking for shakes with fruit-based carbs. For muscle building, consider your protein content.

Weight Loss shakes are formulated to help you lose unwanted fat. Liquid and softer foods are also easier to digest if part of your weight loss program includes healing your gut. Some contain fat burners, while others contain protein to help you feel satisfied longer and keep cravings at bay. Natural fat burners like cocoa, green tea, and cinnamon are Ayurvedic alternatives to synthetic fat burners.

Meal Replacement shakes are intended to be a regular part of a healthy diet, unlike some weight loss products which indicate that they are for short-term use. Meal replacement shakes are easy to prepare and a simple, accessible alternative to high-fat convenience foods. Meal replacements are not snacks; think of them as a meal-on-the-go.

Smoothies are a great way to incorporate raw fruits and vegetables into your diet, so don’t be afraid to go rogue and make your own. When blending fruits and veggies, the best flavor palettes are going to come from sticking to the same color palettes. For instance, oranges and yellows (banana, mango, pineapple) or reds and purples (like cherries and berries) almost always partner well. To stave off hunger, nut butters are a great vegan source of protein.

Be sure to read labels and speak with your doctors before beginning any programs or making changes in your healthcare practice.